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MAKING THAT FINAL DECISION TO SAY GOOD-BYE

MAKING THAT FINAL DECISION TO SAY GOOD-BYE

You're giving me a special gift,
So sorrowfully endowed,
And through these last few cherished days,
Your courage makes me proud.

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Asthma and Bronchitis in Cats

My cat started having coughing spells. I thought she was trying to cough up a hairball. My veterinarian has diagnosed feline asthma and bronchitis. I didn’t know cats could have such a thing.

Feline asthma affects a fair number of cats and is often associated with bronchitis. “Asthma” is technically an acute or chronic inflammation of the airway associated with several physiologic effects including:

  • Increased responsiveness to various noxious stimuli
  • Narrowing/constriction of the airways
  • Reversibility of airway constriction
  • The presence of inflammatory cells within the airways
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Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Poisoning Alert

"IMPORTANT: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is very dangerous to dogs and cats."

Acetaminophen (Tylenol®, Paracetamol, APAP, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) is a pain relief and fever-reducing medicine people use for many types of pain. It’s a popular over-the-counter oral medication used alone or in “combination” medications for headaches, pain, colds, flu and menstrual discomfort. It’s often combined with other drugs including aspirin, opioids, antihistamines, decongestants and caffeine.

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Senior Pet Cognitive Dysfunction

What is cognitive dysfunction, and how is it diagnosed?

It is generally believed that a dog or cat’s cognitive function tends to decline with age, much as it does in people. If your dog or cat has one or more of the signs below and all potential physical or medical causes have been ruled out, it may be due to cognitive dysfunction. Of course, it is also possible that cognitive dysfunction can arise concurrently with other medical problems, so that it might be difficult to determine the exact cause of each sign.

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What is rehabilitation and why is it used?

What is rehabilitation and why is it used?
Lauren Bissonnette RVT CCMT COCM CCRP


Veterinary rehabilitation is nearly identical to physical therapy for people. However, it is a protected term in the province of Ontario; therefore professionals refer to it as veterinary rehabilitation (or rehab). Much like in humans, the focus of veterinary rehabilitation is functionality. Treatment goals are individualized to each patient, designed to optimize movement, and overall quality of life for the patient.

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What is laser therapy and why is it used?

What is laser therapy and why is it used?
Lauren Bissonnette RVT CCMT COCM CCRP

Light energy penetrates through the skin and is absorbed by specific organelles (mitochondria) of cells of all types. The light energy is then converted to bio-chemical energy to help in restoring normal cell function.Phototherapy (also known as low level laser therapy), is a therapeutic physical modality in which light energy (or photons) are used for tissue healing, reducing pain, edema, and inflammation.

Lauren Bissonnette RVT CCMT COCM CCRP
 

Light energy penetrates through the skin and is absorbed by specific organelles (mitochondria) of cells of all types. The light energy is then converted to bio-chemical energy to help in restoring normal cell function.Phototherapy (also known as low level laser therapy), is a therapeutic physical modality in which light energy (or photons) are used for tissue healing, reducing pain, edema, and inflammation.

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Do Dogs Mourn?

Do Dogs Mourn?

Dog lovers consider big, mournful puppy eyes gazing at them to be heartwarming. Those soulful glances melt human hearts. But could those mournful eyes indicate that the dog is actually mourning?

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Recognizing Signs of Illness in Cats

Although cats are predators, in nature larger predators will prey upon them. Since sick or old animals make an easy target, any obvious sign of illness will alert other predators that the animal is ill. Therefore, cats have evolved to hide signs of illness. This means that in the early stages of illness, often the only thing that a cat owner may notice is that the cat has become quiet and withdrawn. Unfortunately, this also means a cat may be very sick before the owner realizes something is wrong.

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Quality-of-Life Scale

SUGGESTIONS ON USING THIS QUALITY-OF-LIFE SCALE:
1. Complete the scale at different times of day to note fluctuations, because most pets do better during the day and worse at night.
2. Ask multiple family members to complete the scale; compare their observations.
3. Take periodic photos of the pet to help remember his or her physical appearance.
 
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Fear of Noises and Places in Dogs

Why is my dog so frightened of loud noises such as thunder, firecrackers, and vehicles?

Fears and phobias can develop from a single experience (one event learning) or from continued exposure to the fearful stimulus. Although some dogs react with a mild fear response of panting and pacing, others get extremely agitated and may panic and/or become destructive. These dogs are experiencing a phobic response to the stimulus. These phobias may develop because of an inherent sensitivity to the stimulus (i.e., a genetic predisposition) or exposure to a highly traumatic experience associated with the stimulus (e.g., a carport collapsing on the dog in a windstorm). With multiple exposures to a fearful event, a dog may become more intensely reactive; receiving attention or affection by well-meaning owners who are trying to calm the dog down may actually intensify the response.

 

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