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Honouring Your Pet - Euthanasia - The most difficult decision you will ever make.

We are not trained to make euthanasia decisions. Most people have little or no experience even thinking about, or discussing the idea of letting an animal die by this process.

When a veterinarian brings up the idea of euthanasia for a very ill, elderly, or injured pet you might find yourself cringing, in an effort to "protect" yourself from even the thought of choosing to say goodbye to your beloved pet. The idea of actually planning a time and place for the death may throw you into a state of confusion, denial, shock, depression, or anger.

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Children and Pets

The birth of a baby or the adoption of a new child is associated with a great deal of anxiety, excitement, and stress for not only the family, but also the family pet. Some dogs and cats can have a difficult time adjusting to these changes, especially if this is your first child, but preparation and planning will help.

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Canine Communication – Interpreting Dog Language

Dog communication uses most of the senses, including smells, sounds and visual cues. Pheromones, glandular secretions, barks, whines, yips, growls, body postures, etc., all serve as effective means of communication between dogs. Unlike in people, canine body postures and olfactory (scent) cues are significant components of dog language and vocal communications are less significant. People are listeners; dogs are watchers. Another major difference between human and canine communication is the type of information communicated.

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What are oral tumors?

What are oral tumors?

Like us, cats can develop oral masses. Some will grow slowly and won’t spread to other locations (benign), while others will spread to different areas of the body causing great harm (malignant). Benign oral tumors generally start in the periodontal ligament, which is located in the tooth socket. The most common types of oral tumors are called peripheral odontogenic fibromas (POFs). The most commonly diagnosed malignant tumor is called squamous cell carcinoma.

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Behavior Counseling - Senior Pet Cognitive Dysfunction

What is cognitive dysfunction, and how is it diagnosed?

It is generally believed that a dog or cat’s cognitive function tends to decline with age, much as it does in people. If your dog or cat has one or more of the signs below and all potential physical or medical causes have been ruled out, it may be due to cognitive dysfunction. Of course, it is also possible that cognitive dysfunction can arise concurrently with other medical problems, so that it might be difficult to determine the exact cause of each sign.

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Obesity in Dogs

In North America, obesity is the most common preventable disease in dogs. Approximately 25-30% of the general canine population is obese, with 40-45% of dogs aged 5-11 years old weighing in higher than normal.

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Veterinary Hospice & the Human-Animal Bond

Veterinary Hospice & the Human-Animal Bond

More clients are requesting hospice care for aging or terminally ill companion animals. Knowing what veterinary hospice care is, how to provide hospice care in the practice or home, and how to assist families in the mitigation of suffering helps ensure quality care. For clients, feeling prepared can help ease tension, strengthen the human–animal bond, and facilitate a peaceful end-of-life experience, helping them cope better with the loss—and possibly preparing them to get another pet in due time.

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Feeding Mature and Senior Cats

The population of mature and senior cats is increasing. In fact, 35-40% of cats in North America are at least 7 years of age, and it’s not uncommon for cats to live well into their twenties. Better nutrition, safer lifestyles, and improvements to preventive healthcare have contributed to this trend. 

While old age is not a disease in itself, the body changes associated with aging make older cats more vulnerable to medical problems and disease. Cancer, kidney disease and heart disease are the most common causes of non-accidental death in cats, but proper nutrition may help mitigate the risk of developing certain diseases and chronic conditions.

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Feeding Mature and Senior Dogs

The population of mature and senior dogs is increasing. Better nutrition, safer lifestyles, and improvements to preventive health care have contributed to this trend.

While old age is not a disease in itself, the body changes associated with aging make older dogs more vulnerable to medical problems and disease. Cancer, kidney disease and heart disease are the most common causes of non-accidental death in dogs, but proper nutrition may help mitigate the risk of developing certain diseases and chronic conditions.

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Cat Behavior and Training - Enrichment for Indoor Cats

I want to get a cat, but I live on a very busy main road, so I am thinking of keeping it indoors. Is that cruel?

There are many circumstances in which keeping a cat indoors may be safer for the cat and therefore, arguably, better for the cat. Indoor cats are at lower risk for injuries associated with the outdoor environment (e.g., cars, trains, dogs, predators, humans) and are at far less risk of contracting parasites and infectious diseases such as feline leukemia, feline infectious peritonitis and feline immunodeficiency virus.

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